Friday, July 6, 2007

Scam Warning for teachers who advertise classes on the internet


Do you ever advertise for private students on the Internet? If so, then from time to time you may receive a response like the following:
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"This is to inform you of a visit my family is taking place in texas and your service will be needed.My family are coming over to the united state for a summer without me.I will want you to let me know your price to teach English in hotel.I will email you the address as soon as i get a response from you.Just email me your price and also your full name,address and cellphone nbr so i can have a Certified check from a usa bank send to you.I will be waiting to read from you asap."
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or this
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"Greetings, How are you doing today, i can read your description and i am very impress and interested in your lesson you advert on web site, my son is coming for an holiday pension in your area,he is 16 years old and he know a little about the lesson for private lesson, so i don't want him to be less busy in the time of the day and i have decide to let him atending your lesson, so he will becoming 2hours in a day(9 am to 11 am) or time that you will have chance,so i want you to calculate the cost for 1 week and send me the total cost and i will be paying you with UK Cashier Cheque that will be easy for you to cash in your country,so get back to me with your cost of 2 hours per day.I will like to hear from you soon via my email address. Best Regard Looking forward to read for you"
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or perhaps in another language
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"mi nombre es Maria Rolston, de Suecia deseo a profesor particular mi hijo que sea 17 años de la edad y quisiera que lo enseñaras para una hora por día 2 veces en una semana por 2 meses y calcular amablemente tu dinero para los 2 meses de profesor particular y me envíen tu nombre completo, la dirección y tu número de teléfono porque te estoy pagando por el cheque y arreglaré el hotel que mi hijo permanecerá en hotel que cerca de tu .kindly casero me envía tu nombre completo, la dirección y tu número de teléfono .thanks"
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The first one was sent to someone in the USA while the last two were sent to teachers in Spain. So it seems teachers everywhere are targeted. I've also heard of a saxophone teacher who received a similar offer.
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The way the scam works is like this: the writer offers to pay you for classes in the first email. If you respond, a contrived reason will be given for why he/she needs to send a payment of a bit more than you are asking. Of course, he/she will say that they will trust you to send them the difference. However, the scam will be a cashiers check which is actually forged and will bounce. The aim is to have you send them the difference before the check bounces.
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Apparently this works well in countries where banks clear certified checks relatively quickly and sometimes even let you withdraw money on it. Of course, when the bank later discovers that the check was a forgery, they take the money back.

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