Sunday, July 1, 2007

In Friday’s News: Solstice Beach Celebrations; Immigration Trends; EU Response to Spain’s Construction Boom; A Weather Prediction

Not only in Barcelona! La nit més curta també es viu a les platges catalanes. (The shortest night is lively on Catalan beaches, too.) Although I will enjoy Saint John's Night in my little neighborhood of Barceloneta, there are, of course a wide variety of celebrations throughout the city as well as throughout the Autonomous Region of Catalonia. Communities up and down the coast, as well as in the interior of the region, have special festivities. Coastal areas have fireworks displays, bonfires and all night dances on the beaches.
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For example, one of BCN’s next door neighbors, Badalona, will host Summersand, an outdoor electronic music festival with several well known DJs. Further north in Mataró, local bands will perform on the city’s beaches. Meanwhile down south in Tarragona, American ska band, The Toasters, will be appearing on Miracle beach. And the photo above is from an invitation I received to a beach party in Gava Mar.
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From one extreme to another: According to the daily newspaper-ito Que!, the neighborhoods in Barcelona with the most Saint John’s Night festivals are Horta and Sant Martí, with 12 each, followed by Sants with 11 and Gracia with 10. The most tranquil are Sant Andreu with 1, Ciutat Vella (this one's actually in my neighborhood, Barceloneta), Les Corts and Sarriá-Sant Gervasi with 2 and Nou Barris with 3.
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Well, Ciutat Vella may only have one neighborhood festival, but it is in Barceloneta and it is definitely a ¡FIESTA! I’m sure all of those neighborhoods with multiple street festivals will be fun to party in but they all lack one thing we are blessed with – A BEACH! ¡Viva la Barceloneta!
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1 in 4 in 2015: Another daily freebie, Metro, reported that if the current trend remains the same, 14.2% of the population of Spain will be immigrant by the year 2015. This was in a report by the Grupo de Estudios de Tendencias Sociales-Fundación Sistema, which also included a profile of today’s typical immigrant: an individual between 30 and 40 years old (49.6%), who rents (82%), holds a temporary job (49%) and who came to Spain without a work permit (72.4%).
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This report reminded me of an interesting article I read recently in Business Week: How Spain Thrives on Immigration. Click on the title to read the article online.
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EU scolds Spain: Today several papers reported on the fact that yesterday the European Parliament passed a motion critical of the unchecked urban development in Madrid and along the Mediterranean. The body apparently agrees with those who claim that poor regulation has combined with corruption and greed to result in a “disastrous effect” on the environment. Parliament claims that the “massive development projects do not respond to real needs.”
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Next week the European Commission plans to take the government of the Autonomous Region of Valencia to the European Court of Justice on a related matter.
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It will be interesting to see how all of this develops and what effect it may have on the construction boom in Spain.
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Surprise, surprise - good weather in Spain: The National Meteorological Institute predicts clement weather in Spain this summer. What a relief!
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Copied from original http://myspainblog.wordpress.com/ posting by Carloz on 22 June, 2007

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